Top 10 Wonderful Benefits of Jasmine Tea

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Jasmine tea is not considered an “herbal tea”, because it is actually normal tea (green, white, black, or oolong) that is flavored with jasmine flowers to create the unique scent and taste.

China has a long and famed history with tea, and jasmine is one of the most popular types to emerge from that ancient nation. Jasmine tea first appears in official records during the Song Dynasty, which ended in the 13th Century A.D., but at that time, it was mainly reserved for royalty. It may have originally come from Persia, through India, along with the cultural exportation of Buddhism to China. In later dynasties, jasmine tea became a common export to the western world, and remains very popular to this day.

The tea can be made in a number of ways, of varying strengths and grades. Some are made as loose-leaf teas, while others are cut up and put into teabags. Some are rolled or bound in different shapes, like the very common “jasmine pearl”, usually composed of two tea buds and one tea leaf.

All of the varying types, regardless of shape, need to be scented before becoming “jasmine tea”. There are a number of methods to do this; from very simple physical mixtures, to complex air filtering and aroma mixing for a pure, light taste. The creation of delicious and effective jasmine tea truly is an art in itself. Jasmine tea extract, which can also be added to drinks in order to gain the healthy effects of jasmine tea, without having to brew the tea.

One reason jasmine tea is so popular is due to its many benefits to overall health, which come from the nutritional elements in the organic tea buds themselves. It is a wonderful means of adding somewhat uncommon antioxidants to your system like catechins and epicatechins, which can have a wide range of beneficial effects on your system.

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